CFP: SPHM INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2020 Media Trades and Professions

(FRENCH VERSION below)

Capture d’écran 2019-06-26 à 06.46.45

AAC – SPHM INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2020

Media Trades and Professions

(18th to 21st Century)

June 4th to 6th, 2020

University of Lausanne

(Switzerland)

This third edition of the SPHM International Conference is organised by the Society for Media History (la Société pour l’histoire des Médias, http://www.histoiredesmedias.com) and by the Centre for the Historical Sciences of Culture of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Lausanne (le Centre des Sciences historiques de la culture de la Faculté des Lettres, https://www.unil.ch/shc), with the support of several research laboratories based in Switzerland, France, Luxembourg, and Québec[1], including the National Audiovisual Institute (Institut national de l’audiovisuel) and the Historical Committee of the Audiovisual and Digital Observatory (Comité d’histoire de l’Observatoire de l’audiovisuel et du numérique).

As with the two previous editions, this conference aims to bring together both junior and senior international researchers, historians, and specialists from diverse disciplines around a common field of study: media history. The selected theme, “Media Trades and Professions” is intended to be sufficiently inclusive to allow specialists in the field, regardless of their methods or approaches, to contribute to discourses of collective reflection while illuminating new areas of research that have yet to be explored by the community. The organisers are devoted to promoting multidisciplinary, transmedia, and transnational approaches, remaining particularly receptive to media and geographical zones less marked by historiographical perspectives.

1-Realms of Representation

First and foremost, this Conference strives to challenge the constructed representations of media trades and professions that have been disseminated since the end of the eighteenth century. This practice may consist of studies devoted to the methods of representation of these professionals in the context of various forms of cultural productions (media, literary, visual, and theatrical productions, amongst others) but also of investigations specifically related to the ways in which professionals think, perceive, and represent themselves and one another. Comparative approaches – in particular those that are transnational – are especially valuable here, as are bodies of work that are interested in examining the contrasts between the study of these representations with the material, economic, and practical conditions of their productions.

These representational approaches may revolve around different types of inquiries:

– How did shared ideologies such as values, worldviews, and political positions evolve during different historical periods within certain professional circles of the media industry?

– How do these professions develop, forge their legitimacy, and work to establish professional standards? How do certain professional circles construct, often through interactions with other disciplines, their identity, sense of belonging, or a collective memory of their own history?

– What are the tensions that arise between the prestigious status of certain professions and the economic and social fragility that often manifests as a source of frustration with one’s vision of their own endeavours? From this perspective, it is essential to acknowledge various inequalities of gender, social class, race, territory, etc., considering the reality that the precarious nature of media professions affects groups and individuals in unequal ways.

– How can research in the fields of human and social sciences contribute to the development, dissemination, and evolution of different forms of political, professional, or institutional representations (local, national, and transnational associations; labour unions, lobby organisations; professional press groups…)?

 

2-Professional Practice Methods

Proposals may also be concerned with the study of professional practices. More specifically, with a focus on the diversity of these professions and practices. Proposals may, of course, pertain to professional sectors that have already been extensively studied within historiography (certain journalism and cinema occupations, for example). However, the organisational committee of this conference wishes to promote research on professional practices that remain of little interest to researchers or that pose difficulties in access to sources. Such trades that would deserve further attention from researchers, to name a few, include television and radio editors; set decorators; proof-readers in the printing industry; readers, agents, and designers in publishing; press correspondents; theatre prompters or leaders of applause; or even crowd-warmers or impresarios…

The study of such practices can unearth questions surrounding the nature of the limits of these professions:

– What exactly differentiates professional practices from amateur ones in these various domains?

– What are the “admission tickets” or the “barriers” associated with the practice of certain professions (for example, a press pass in journalism)?

– Which professions, of those that are not directly involved in the production of media content, are intimately linked to the history of media (for example, industrial and engineering professions, specialists from international organisations, media sociologists and historians)?

– In which ways are media professionals linked to institutions that are not directly related to the production of media (military film operators and audiovisual supervisors at schools and universities, for example)?

The study of professional practices may promote awareness and appreciation for certain locations, actors, and dynamics. The organisers will be particularly receptive to proposals that facilitate research on the international circulation of particular models, recognition of professional profiles (the roles of cultural mediators, international trajectories, the places that educate countless foreign students…), and the long-term, widespread study of the transformations or eccentricities of these professional practices. Questions surrounding the workspaces of media professionals (from offices to studios to open-air laboratories), as well as their materials (tools and objects; technological advances; devices and channels; the rise of digital technologies and their subsequent uses, their dissemination, and impacts; processes of dematerialisation…), are also welcome in the Conference programme.

Lastly, the examination of professional practice methods may stimulate questions regarding the different articulations of individual and collective practices and to distinguish prominent figures of a certain profession having, for example, an anonymous author or artist status to which it could be valuable to pay attention.

 

3-The Sociology of Media Professions 

These proposals will have the capacity to unite various sociological or socio-historical approaches in order to demystify the mechanisms specific to the structure of certain media professions, the strategies of legitimisation and prestige within them, and the recomposition of socio-professional groups during certain historical periods. Among the questions that may be explored in this perspective:

– What role does discrimination play in access to certain occupations, and what are the obstacles related to class, gender, race, nationality, religion and/or generational inequalities?

– What are some pathways and sites of training (highlighting in some cases the weight of self-education), the nature and evolution of remuneration, the diversity of career paths emphasised by a transnational perspective, the characteristics or traditions specific to certain spheres, as well as the forms of partnership or assembly at the international level?

– How can we map the legitimisation strategies of the press and of professional associations, as well as of certain sites of sociability specific to particular professions (conferences, festivals, expositions, exhibitions, etc.)?

– What role do power dynamics play within each professional environment? What are the relationships between those who possess power, be they political authorities or economic and financial actors?

 

4-Relationships with Audiences and the Public Opinion

The research of media trades, professions, and professionals must also promote the study of the connections between professionals and their public(s) by investigating, for example:

– Occupations directly related to media reception analysis in a qualitative and/or quantitative perspective (long-term audience measurement analysis, implementation of surveys);

– The presentation of professional actors at the interface between the media and the public (for example, mediators in editorial offices, censorship boards, or appeal or complaint authorities that make decisions concerning ethical issues);

– The integration of audience expectations and the influence of public feedback on the production of media content (analysis of market research, public testing);

– The evolution of the public perception of these professions, particularly during significant social movements (the representation of journalists during the Revolution of 1830…up until the yellow vests).

 

5- Methodological and Epistemological Reflections on Research-Based Approaches

Proposals reflecting on contemporary writing regarding the history of media trades, professions, and professionals are also welcome. Particular examples in this area of research include:

– The temporalities related to media professions/professionals and how to understand them throughout history. This may take into account historical complexities and questions about the nature of temporalities encountered by media professionals in their endeavours, whether in terms of the treatment of their subject matter, recourse to historical revelations, career patterns, positions regarding programme structures, changes related to the introduction of rebroadcasting, of the digital, etc., and the presentation of historical processes that determine them. The integration of methods borrowed from other disciplines (participatory observations, fieldwork…) to develop understanding, notably experiences such as those led by John Ellis and his team within the ADAPT project (http://www.adapttvhistory.org.uk) of historical re-enactment of the practices of television professionals, may be presented;

– Sites of analysis, whether to propose case studies that raise awareness of international cultural circulations, places of exchange, reference and living spaces of a profession, heritage domains, or to interrogate perspectives and obstacles of comparative and circulatory research approaches;

– Challenges that researchers face in accessing and preserving the archives of media professions and professionals. Testimonials, objects, oral interviews, and many other sources and archives, as well as their presentation in narratives or exhibitions, can effectively be questioned;

– Interdisciplinary practices can be gathered – for example, approaches to media professions and professionals through a gender studies or postcolonial studies perspective. Research comparing the reciprocal issues of disciplinary approaches and studies are welcome.

– The role of the digital, whether as a tool or support for media professions and professionals or as a means by which to access sources to trace their histories. The changes in research methods by the widespread use of digital technologies in many media-related professions, as well as by the appearance of natively digital archives (for example, INA’s archiving of twitter accounts belonging to audiovisual journalists, etc.), seem to be equally fruitful areas of study.

Ultimately, these three days will be dedicated to establishing a wide panorama of the diversity of contemporary modes of production of knowledge on media trades, professions, and professionals in an attempt to review the concepts, debates, and methods that have been addressed while identifying the obstacles, perspectives, and the unexpected elements fundamental to the future challenges that the historian will have to overcome. 

Proposal Submissions:

Communication proposals may be individual or collective. For the latter, proposals may not have more than a maximum of three co-authors.

You also have the opportunity to submit a panel proposal (a session on a given topic) including a general description and an explanation of the individual interventions anticipated.

Proposals (a maximum of 3000 characters in Word or PDF files) must include a title, an explicit problematic, and a short bibliography. The author must attach a short bio-bibliographic record (15 lines) in a separate file.

Proposals will be subject to a double-blind peer review process.

Proposals must be sent no later than September 20th, 2019 to the following address: SPHM2020lausanne@unil.ch

 

Practical Information:

Registration fees (speakers and audience):

– For members of the SPHM (membership 25 euros, 13 euros for students), the Conference is free with a subscription before April 30, 2020.

– From May 1st onwards, and in-person at the event, registration for the Conference will be 40 euros (45 Swiss francs or 56 USD).

The Conference will provide free coffee and lunches for the those who are presenting. Accommodation and travel expenses are the responsibility of the presenters.

However, funding may be awarded in exceptional cases to young, unfunded researchers on the basis of a written application. This application, including proof from the affiliated academic institution confirming that it cannot provide any funding, should be attached to the communication proposal and sent to the same address: SPHM2020lausanne@unil.ch.

With a duration of 20 minutes, papers may be written and presented in either French or English. They should be accompanied by a presentation projected in the other language.

 

Schedule:

September 20th, 2019: Deadline for proposals

November 25th, 2019: Notification of acceptance

June 4th – 6th, 2020: Conference at the University of Lausanne Campus

 

Organisational Committee:

Marta Caraion (Unil, CSHC)

Christian Delporte (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Emmanuelle Fantin (Sorbonne-Université, GRIPIC)

Gianni Haver (Unil, Institut des Sciences Sociales)

Philippe Kaenel (Unil, CSHC)

Katharina Niemeyer (Université du Québec à Montréal, CELAT)

François Robinet (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Monika Salzbrunn (Unil, Institut de Sciences sociales des religions)

Valérie Schafer (Université du Luxembourg, C2DH)

François Vallotton (Unil, CSHC)

Isabelle Veyrat-Masson (LCP – IRISSO, CNRS Paris Dauphine)

Anne-Katrin Weber (Unil, CSHC)

 

Scientific Committee:

Comité scientifique :

Gabriele Balbi (USI Università della Svizzera italiana, Institute of Media and Journalism)

Maëlle Bazin (Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, CARISM)

Claire Blandin (Université Paris 13, LabSic)

Jérôme Bourdon (Tel Aviv University, Department of Communication)

María Cecilia Bravo N. (Universidad de Chile, Instituto de la Comunicación e Imagen)

Josette Brun (Université Laval, Département d’information et de communication)

Tamara Chaplin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies)

Évelyne Cohen (ENSSIB – Université de Lyon, LARHRA UMR CNRS 5190)

Delphine Chedaleux (Université de Lausanne, FNS)

Alain Clavien (Université de Fribourg)

Ross Collins (North Dakota States University, Department of Communication)

Jamil Dakhlia (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3, IRMECCEN)

Claire-Lise Debluë (Université Paris I & St Andrews University, FNS)

Annik Dubied (Université de Neuchâtel, Académie du journalisme et des médias)

Andreas Fickers (Université du Luxembourg, Centre for Contemporary and Digital History)

Françoise Hache-Bissette (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Markus Krajewski (Universität Basel, Department Arts, Media, Philosophy)

Matthias Künzler (Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft HTW Chur, Institut für Multimedia Production)

Thibault Le Hégarat (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Cécile Méadel (Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, CARISM)

Caroline Moine (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines – Centre Marc Bloch, CHCSC)

Enrico Natale (Université de Bâle, infoclio.ch)

Raphaëlle Ruppen-Coutaz (LabEx EHNE, FNS)

Marie-Ève Thérenty (Université de Montpellier 3, RIRRA 21)

Jean-François Tétu (Université Lyon 2, Elico)

Dominique Trudel (Université du Québec, Département de Communication)

Nelly Valsangiacomo (Université de Lausanne, Centre des Sciences historiques de la culture)

Jean-Claude Yon (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

[1] Le Centre des sciences historiques de la culture at Unil, l’Institut des sciences sociales at Unil, le Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines at UVSQ, le LCP – IRISSO CNRS Paris Dauphine, the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History at the University of Luxembourg, Carism at Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, Irméccen at Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3, CELAT (Centre de recherche et laboratoire Cultures-Arts-Société, Université Laval, Université du Québec à Montréal et Université du Québec à Chicoutimi) and le Comité d’histoire de l’audiovisuel et du numérique.

 

___

Capture d’écran 2019-06-26 à 06.46.45

AAC – CONGRÈS DE LA SPHM 2020

Métiers et professions des médias (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles)

Du 4 au 6 juin 2020

Université de Lausanne

(Suisse)

Cette troisième édition du Congrès de la SPHM est organisée par la Société pour l’histoire des Médias (http://www.histoiredesmedias.com) et par le Centre des Sciences historiques de la culture de la Faculté des Lettres de l’Université de Lausanne (https://www.unil.ch/shc), avec le soutien de plusieurs laboratoires de recherche, suisses, français et luxembourgeois[1], ainsi que celui de l’Institut national de l’audiovisuel et du Comité d’histoire de l’Observatoire de l’audiovisuel et du numérique.

 

Comme lors de ses deux éditions précédentes, le Congrès se donne pour objectif de réunir des chercheuses et chercheurs internationaux, juniors ou confirmé-e-s, historien-ne-s ou spécialistes d’autres disciplines, autour d’un champ d’études commun : l’histoire des médias. La thématique choisie, « Métiers et professions des médias », se veut suffisamment inclusive pour permettre aux spécialistes du champ, quels que soient leurs méthodes ou leurs approches, de proposer une contribution à la réflexion collective, tout en attirant l’attention de la communauté sur des pistes de recherche encore peu explorées. Les organisateurs-trices seraient en outre désireux de favoriser des approches pluridisciplinaires, transmédiatiques mais aussi transnationales tout en proposant des ouvertures sur des médias et des espaces géographiques moins balisés par l’historiographie.

 

1-L’espace des représentations

En premier lieu, le Congrès vise à interroger les représentations construites et diffusées depuis la fin du XVIIIe siècle des métiers et des professions des médias. Il pourra s’agir d’études consacrées aux modalités de représentations de ces professionnel-le-s au sein de productions culturelles de diverses natures (productions médiatiques mais également littéraires, picturales, théâtrales…) mais aussi d’enquêtes portant plus spécifiquement sur la manière dont les professionnel-le-s se pensent, se perçoivent, se représentent. Les approches comparatives – voire transnationales – seront ici particulièrement précieuses de même que les travaux soucieux de confronter l’étude des représentations aux conditions matérielles, économiques et pratiques de leurs productions.

L’approche par les représentations pourra faire l’objet de différents types de questionnements :

– Quelles furent les évolutions aux différentes époques des valeurs, des représentations du monde, des positionnements politiques voire des idéologies partagées, plus ou moins largement, au sein de certains groupes professionnels du monde des médias ?

– Comment ces professions se mettent-elles en scène, forgent-elles leur légitimité, œuvrent-elles à la valorisation de leurs normes professionnelles ? Comment certains groupes professionnels construisent-ils, souvent en interaction avec d’autres champs d’activité, leur identité, des formes de sentiment d’appartenance ou encore une mémoire partagée de leur propre histoire ?

– Quelles sont les tensions entre le prestige de certains métiers et une fragilité économique et sociale qui est souvent source de frustration dans la vision qu’ont les acteurs de leur propre activité. Il convient d’intégrer dans cette perspective les inégalités de genre, de classe sociale, de race, de territoire etc., car la précarisation des métiers des médias touche les groupes et individus de façon inégale.

– Que peut apporter la recherche en sciences humaines et sociales sur l’émergence, le déploiement et les mutations de différentes formes de représentations politiques, professionnelles ou institutionnelles (associations – locales, nationales et transnationales ; syndicats ; groupes de pression ; presse professionnelle…).

 

2-Approche par les pratiques professionnelles

Les propositions pourront également s’intéresser à l’étude des pratiques professionnelles. Il s’agira plus spécifiquement de porter attention à la diversité des professions et des pratiques. Les propositions pourront bien sûr porter sur des secteurs professionnels déjà largement étudiés par l’historiographie (par exemple certains métiers du journalisme et du cinéma) mais les organisateurs de ce Congrès sont désireux de valoriser des travaux portant sur des domaines professionnels qui intéressent encore peu les chercheuses et chercheurs ou qui posent des problèmes d’accès aux sources. Bien des métiers mériteraient ainsi une attention accrue de la part de la recherche, tels les monteurs et monteuses de radio ou de télévision, les décorateurs-trices de plateaux, les correcteurs-trices dans les métiers de l’imprimerie, les lecteurs-trices, agent-e-s ou maquettistes dans l’édition, les correspondant-e-s dans le monde de la presse, les chef-fe-s de claque ou les souffleuses ou souffleurs dans le monde du théâtre ou encore le chauffeur de salle ou l’impresario…, pour ne donner ici que quelques exemples.

L’étude des pratiques peut déboucher sur des interrogations concernant les frontières des professions :

– Dans les différents domaines concernés, qu’est-ce qui distingue les pratiques professionnelles des pratiques amateures ?

– Quels sont les « tickets d’entrée » ou les « barrières » liées à l’exercice de certains métiers (exemple de la carte de presse pour le journalisme) ?

– Quelles sont les professions qui, sans être directement dédiées à la production de contenus médiatiques, sont intimement liées à l’histoire des médias (exemple des ingénieur-e-s et des professions industrielles, des expert-e-s des organisations internationales, des sociologues et historien-ne-s des médias…) ?

– Quels sont en outre les professionnel-le-s des médias rattaché-e-s à des institutions qui ne sont pas directement concerné-e-s par les productions médiatiques (exemple des opérateurs de cinéma de l’armée, des responsables de l’audiovisuel des écoles et des universités…) ?

L’étude des pratiques professionnelles pourra permettre la valorisation de certains lieux, de certains acteurs et de certaines dynamiques. Les organisateurs-trices seront particulièrement attentifs aux propositions qui permettent l’étude de la circulation internationale de modèles particuliers, la mise en valeur de profils professionnels (rôle de médiateurs culturels, parcours internationaux, lieux formant de nombreux étudiant-e-s étranger-e-s…), l’étude sur le temps long et dans des espaces différents des mutations ou spécificités des pratiques professionnelles. Les questions des espaces de travail des professionnel-le-s des médias (des bureaux aux studios, des laboratoires au plein air) ainsi que des matérialités (outils et objets ; mutations techniques ; supports et canaux ; essor des technologies numériques dans leurs usages, leur diffusion, leurs effets ; processus de dématérialisation…) trouveront aussi leur place dans la programmation du Congrès.

L’approche par les pratiques pourra enfin permettre de questionner les articulations entre pratiques individuelles et collectives et de distinguer les figures reconnues de la profession ayant par exemple un statut d’auteur-e-s ou d’artistes des anonymes de la profession auxquels il pourrait être précieux de porter attention.

 

3-Sociologie des professions

Les propositions pourront mobiliser diverses approches sociologiques ou socio-historiques afin d’éclairer les mécanismes propres à la constitution de certaines professions médiatiques, les stratégies de légitimation et de distinction en leur sein, la recomposition de groupes socio-professionnels lors de certaines périodes historiques. Parmi les questions qui pourraient être articulées dans cette perspective :

– Quelle est la part des inégalités dans l’accès à certaines professions et quelles sont notamment les barrières de classe, de genre, de race, de nationalité, de religion et/ou de génération ;

– Quels sont les parcours et les lieux de formation (en mettant en exergue dans certains cas le poids de l’autodaxie), la nature et l’évolution des rémunérations, la diversité des parcours professionnels en soulignant, dans une perspective transnationale, les spécificités ou traditions propres à certains espaces mais aussi les formes de fédération ou de regroupement au niveau international ;

– Comment cartographier certaines stratégies de légitimation, via la presse et les associations professionnelles, mais aussi par certains lieux de sociabilité propres à certains métiers (congrès, festivals, salons, expositions, etc.) ;

– Quelle est la part des relations de pouvoir au sein de chaque milieu professionnel mais aussi des relations de chacun d’entre eux avec le pouvoir, qu’il s’agisse d’autorités politiques ou d’acteurs économiques et financiers.

 

4-Les rapports aux publics et à l’opinion

L’étude des métiers et des professionnel-le-s des médias doit également permettre d’étudier les liens entre professionnel-le-s et leur public en s’interrogeant par exemple sur :

– Les métiers directement liés à l’analyse de la réception des médias, dans une perspective qualitative et/ou quantitative (analyse des mesures d’audience dans la longue durée, mise en place de sondages) ;

– La présentation d’acteurs professionnels à l’interface entre médias et public (par exemple les médiateur-trice-s au sein de certaines rédactions, certains organes de censure ou des autorités de recours ou de plainte amenées à se prononcer sur des questions déontologiques) ;

– L’intégration des attentes des publics et les effets en retour sur la production des contenus médiatiques (analyse des études de marché, publics test) ;

– L’évolution des représentations de ces professions dans l’opinion et notamment lors de certains mouvements sociaux d’importance (la représentation des journalistes lors de la Révolution de 1830… et jusqu’aux gilets jaunes).

 

5- Réflexion méthodologique et épistémologique sur les approches mobilisées par la recherche

Les propositions livrant une réflexion sur la manière dont s’écrit aujourd’hui l’histoire des professions et des professionnel-le-s des médias seront également valorisées.  À titre d’exemples, pourront être notamment étudiés :

– Les temporalités à l’œuvre au sein des professions/professionnel-le-s des médias et la manière de les saisir historiquement. Il s’agira de prendre en compte la profondeur historique et la question des temporalités auxquelles se confrontent les professionnel-le-s des médias dans leur activité professionnelle, que ce soit en termes de traitement de leur sujet, de recours à des éclairages historiques, mais aussi de rythme des carrières, de positionnement par rapport aux grilles de programmes, de changements liés à l’introduction de la rediffusion, du numérique, etc. et de présenter la démarche historique permettant de les retracer. L’intégration de méthodes empruntées à d’autres disciplines (observations participantes, terrains…) pour s’en saisir, des expériences comme celles menées par John Ellis et son équipe au sein du projet ADAPT (http://www.adapttvhistory.org.uk) de reconstitution historique des pratiques des professionnel-le-s de la télévision, pourront être présentées ;

– Les espaces d’analyse, qu’il s’agisse de proposer des études de cas éclairant les circulations culturelles internationales, les lieux d’échanges, les espaces de référence et de vie d’une profession, les milieux patrimoniaux, ou d’interroger les perspectives et les obstacles pour la recherche des approches comparatives et circulatoires ;

– Les enjeux pour les chercheurs de l’accès et de la conservation des archives des professions et des professionnel-le-s des médias. Témoignages, objets, entretiens oraux, et bien d’autres sources et archives, ainsi que leur mise en récit ou en exposition, pourront ainsi utilement être interrogés;

– Les pratiques interdisciplinaires pouvant être convoquées, par exemple les approches des professions et professionnel-le-s des médias par les études genre ou les études postcoloniales. Les productions comparant les enjeux réciproques des approches disciplinaires et des studies seront les bienvenues.

– La place du numérique, que ce soit comme outil ou support des professions et professionnel-le-s des médias ou comme moyen d’accéder à des sources permettant de retracer leur histoire. Les changements opérés pour la recherche par les usages généralisés du numérique dans de nombreuses professions liées au monde des médias ainsi que par l’apparition d’archives nativement numériques (par exemple l’archivage par l’Ina de comptes twitter des journalistes de l’audiovisuel, etc.) semblent un enjeu également fécond.

 

En définitive, il s’agira pendant ces trois jours de dresser un large panorama de la diversité des modes de production contemporains des savoirs sur les métiers et les professions des médias, de revisiter les concepts, débats et méthodes mobilisés tout en cernant des obstacles, des impensés, des perspectives, constitutifs des défis futurs que l’historien-ne aura à surmonter.

 

Soumission des propositions :

Les propositions de communication peuvent être individuelles ou collectives. Pour ces dernières, elles doivent associer un maximum de trois co-auteurs.

Vous avez également la possibilité de soumettre une proposition de panel (une session sur un thème donné) comprenant une description générale et la mention des interventions individuelles envisagées.

 

Les propositions (3000 signes maximum en fichiers word ou pdf) comporteront un titre, une problématique explicite et une courte bibliographie. L’auteur-e joindra une courte notice bio-bibliographique (15 lignes) dans un fichier séparé.

Les propositions feront l’objet d’un processus d’expertise en double-aveugle.

Les propositions doivent être envoyées au plus tard le 20 septembre 2019 à l’adresse suivante : SPHM2020lausanne@unil.ch

 

Informations pratiques :

Frais d’inscription (communicants et public) :

– pour les adhérent-e-s à la SPHM (adhésion 25 euros, 13 euros pour les étudiant-e-s) à jour de leur cotisation avant le 30 avril 2020, le Congrès est gratuit,

– à partir du 1er mai et sur place, l’inscription au Congrès sera de 40 euros (45 francs suisses, ou 56 USD).

Le colloque prendra en charge les pauses café, ainsi que les frais de déjeuner pour les personnes présentant une communication. Les frais d’hébergement et de déplacement sont à la charge des intervenant-e-s.

Des financements pourront néanmoins être attribués à titre exceptionnel et sur dossier aux jeunes chercheuses et chercheurs non financés. Ce dossier, comprenant une attestation de l’unité de rattachement confirmant qu’elle ne peut prendre en charge ce financement, devra être joint à la proposition de communication et adressée à la même adresse : SPHM2020lausanne@unil.ch

D’une durée de 20 minutes, les communications seront faites en français ou en anglais. Elles devront s’appuyer sur une présentation projetée dans l’autre langue.

 

Calendrier :

20 septembre 2019 : réception des propositions

25 novembre 2019 : notification d’acceptation

4 – 6 juin 2020 : Congrès sur le Campus de l’Université de Lausanne

 

Comité d’organisation :

Marta Caraion (Unil, CSHC)

Christian Delporte (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Emmanuelle Fantin (Sorbonne-Université, GRIPIC)

Gianni Haver (Unil, Institut des Sciences Sociales)

Philippe Kaenel (Unil, CSHC)

Katharina Niemeyer (Université du Québec à Montréal, CELAT)

François Robinet (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Monika Salzbrunn (Unil, Institut de Sciences sociales des religions)

Valérie Schafer (Université du Luxembourg, C2DH)

François Vallotton (Unil, CSHC)

Isabelle Veyrat-Masson (LCP – IRISSO, CNRS Paris Dauphine)

Anne-Katrin Weber (Unil, CSHC)

 

Comité scientifique :

Gabriele Balbi (USI Università della Svizzera italiana, Institute of Media and Journalism)

Maëlle Bazin (Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, CARISM)

Claire Blandin (Université Paris 13, LabSic)

Jérôme Bourdon (Tel Aviv University, Department of Communication)

María Cecilia Bravo N. (Universidad de Chile, Instituto de la Comunicación e Imagen)

Josette Brun (Université Laval, Département d’information et de communication)

Tamara Chaplin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies)

Évelyne Cohen (ENSSIB – Université de Lyon, LARHRA UMR CNRS 5190)

Delphine Chedaleux (Université de Lausanne, FNS)

Alain Clavien (Université de Fribourg)

Ross Collins (North Dakota States University, Department of Communication)

Jamil Dakhlia (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3, IRMECCEN)

Claire-Lise Debluë (Université Paris I & St Andrews University, FNS)

Annik Dubied (Université de Neuchâtel, Académie du journalisme et des médias)

Andreas Fickers (Université du Luxembourg, Centre for Contemporary and Digital History)

Françoise Hache-Bissette (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Markus Krajewski (Universität Basel, Department Arts, Media, Philosophy)

Matthias Künzler (Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft HTW Chur, Institut für Multimedia Production)

Thibault Le Hégarat (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

Cécile Méadel (Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, CARISM)

Caroline Moine (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines – Centre Marc Bloch, CHCSC)

Enrico Natale (Université de Bâle, infoclio.ch)

Raphaëlle Ruppen-Coutaz (LabEx EHNE, FNS)

Marie-Ève Thérenty (Université de Montpellier 3, RIRRA 21)

Jean-François Tétu (Université Lyon 2, Elico)

Dominique Trudel (Université du Québec, Département de Communication)

Nelly Valsangiacomo (Université de Lausanne, Centre des Sciences historiques de la culture)

Jean-Claude Yon (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC)

 

[1] Le Centre des sciences historiques de la culture de l’Unil, l’Institut des sciences sociales de l’Unil, le Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines de l’UVSQ, le LCP – IRISSO CNRS Paris Dauphine, le Centre for Contemporary and Digital History de l’Université du Luxembourg, le Carism, l’Irméccen, le CELAT (Centre de recherche et laboratoire Cultures-Arts-Société, Université Laval, Université du Québec à Montréal et Université du Québec à Chicoutimi) et le Comité d’histoire de l’audiovisuel et du numérique.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s